It’s depressing, no?

4 Aug

I’m sorry, but is it just me, or is our politics painfully depressing?

Okay Labour is finished. I want this tired and rudderless government out of power as much as the next man, but aren’t we just exchanging one set of aimless wasters for another?

Cameron offers us what?

The Tories don’t even pretend to have a set of radical reforms to shake up our stale and discredited political system. David Cameron believes the path to political success is to appear ever-so-slightly less shit than the current PM, and to swear on the radio in desperate move to appear the gritty everyman* — and not at all the over-privilidged Etonian square he really is.

Now before you scream class snobbery, let me say that I couldn’t care less about Cameron’s background. But I do put great stock in authenticity, and Slippery Dave has none.

Now a Tory government is far less certain than people think. The political map is so heavily stacked against the Tories, that a modest recovery by Labour could force a hung-parliament or a narrow Labour win. However, with most of the left-wing press as hungry for a Labour defeat as everyone else, it’s hardly likely that a positive story will get anything like the traction needed to change people’s perception.

So this is our future. The awful prospect of a Tory government so lacking in sparkle and adventure, that it makes a night in with a pumice stone seem electrifying.

I know this blog is poisoned by negativity. But politics is just so dispiriting at the moment that it’s hard to find the heart to write about it. The expenses scandal may have been juicy for some bloggers, but for me it drained the last trickle of faith I had in politics.

As some of you may have noticed, I’ve stepped down from Liberal Conspiracy as Deputy Editor. I couldn’t give Sunny the energy I once did, but I wish him all the success in the future. And I want to take this blog in a new direction. I just haven’t decided for certain which one. I’ll get back to you soon, if you’re still around.

If you care, I can usually be found at Rational Geekery or bitching on twitter. Oh, and my new project with Zhisou is ongoing — a podcast. We hope to record the second proper episode this week.

*a move straight from the Blair play-book if ever there was one

Advertisements

24 Responses to “It’s depressing, no?”

  1. 67pepeperez@gmal.com August 5, 2009 at 6:45 am #

    Depressing indeed, Tyger. When a country debates which of two evils to elect, then we may say matters are really awful. That a country cannot get itself out of this situation is really what impelled great revolutions in the past.I’m afraid those revolutions are a past thing, the fighting determination our ancestors had is lost on us.Alas!

  2. 67pepeperez@gmal.com August 5, 2009 at 6:45 am #

    Depressing indeed, Tyger. When a country debates which of two evils to elect, then we may say matters are really awful. That a country cannot get itself out of this situation is really what impelled great revolutions in the past.I’m afraid those revolutions are a past thing, the fighting determination our ancestors had is lost on us.Alas!

  3. danielhg@gmail.com August 5, 2009 at 10:43 am #

    I’ve only just got into Lib Con and now you’re not there anymore.BOO!Having said that, I underatand why you’d want a break, there are some infernal tits in the comments section but it is a better place than most of the hellholes I frequent.

  4. danielhg@gmail.com August 5, 2009 at 10:43 am #

    I’ve only just got into Lib Con and now you’re not there anymore.BOO!Having said that, I underatand why you’d want a break, there are some infernal tits in the comments section but it is a better place than most of the hellholes I frequent.

  5. blog@davecole.org August 7, 2009 at 11:09 pm #

    I’m half thinking about running for Mayor of London on a platform of independence for London. Throw off the shackles of English oppression!More seriously, I do wonder what the realistic prospects are for a new party, particularly if we remain under a majoritarian system. I had hopes for the UPyD in Spain, where the PSOE and PP seem to be similarly lacklustre to Labour and the Tories here, but they are going nowhere fast.I do hope you continue writing. Tygerland was one of the first blogs I read on a regular basis, and I still enjoy it thoroughly.PS – Jose, in the immortal words of South Park, it’s always a choice between a douche and a turd sandwich.

  6. blog@davecole.org August 7, 2009 at 11:09 pm #

    I’m half thinking about running for Mayor of London on a platform of independence for London. Throw off the shackles of English oppression!More seriously, I do wonder what the realistic prospects are for a new party, particularly if we remain under a majoritarian system. I had hopes for the UPyD in Spain, where the PSOE and PP seem to be similarly lacklustre to Labour and the Tories here, but they are going nowhere fast.I do hope you continue writing. Tygerland was one of the first blogs I read on a regular basis, and I still enjoy it thoroughly.PS – Jose, in the immortal words of South Park, it’s always a choice between a douche and a turd sandwich.

  7. 67pepeperez@gmal.com August 8, 2009 at 1:44 pm #

    LOL. Is it then “vote or die”, Dave Cole?I’ve always insisted on our obligation to vote, perhaps insert a blank vote will do, but again this will propitiate a revolution.Overrule the parties by massively signing on in their electorate? Who dares?

  8. 67pepeperez@gmal.com August 8, 2009 at 1:44 pm #

    LOL. Is it then “vote or die”, Dave Cole?I’ve always insisted on our obligation to vote, perhaps insert a blank vote will do, but again this will propitiate a revolution.Overrule the parties by massively signing on in their electorate? Who dares?

  9. mrzhisou@gmail.com August 9, 2009 at 2:10 pm #

    Dave Cole – UPyD are going nowhere fast, that is so true. They seem to be as much out of ideas and vision and anyone else.

  10. mrzhisou@gmail.com August 9, 2009 at 2:10 pm #

    Dave Cole – UPyD are going nowhere fast, that is so true. They seem to be as much out of ideas and vision and anyone else.

  11. blog@davecole.org August 10, 2009 at 10:52 am #

    I’m not sure that UPyD are out of vision, tbh. The problems they’re having are due to Rosa Diez’s style of leadership and a tendency towards diktat. I think they also tried to grow to quickly, and ended up raising expectations and running some very strange people as candidates, apparently only because they were already well known. They still articulate an opposition to the nationalism of the PNV and CiU without being the PP or neoFranquista and have, I think, a vision of what the state should be that, at the moment, PSOE & PP lack. They’re about the only people who are talking about legal reforms, for instance.I had hoped that UPyD would break the mould and end up revitalising the PSOE. Maybe it will yet.

  12. blog@davecole.org August 10, 2009 at 10:52 am #

    I’m not sure that UPyD are out of vision, tbh. The problems they’re having are due to Rosa Diez’s style of leadership and a tendency towards diktat. I think they also tried to grow to quickly, and ended up raising expectations and running some very strange people as candidates, apparently only because they were already well known. They still articulate an opposition to the nationalism of the PNV and CiU without being the PP or neoFranquista and have, I think, a vision of what the state should be that, at the moment, PSOE & PP lack. They’re about the only people who are talking about legal reforms, for instance.I had hoped that UPyD would break the mould and end up revitalising the PSOE. Maybe it will yet.

  13. blog@davecole.org August 10, 2009 at 11:02 am #

    Jose – absolutely. Vote or eat a turd sandwich!I agree with Zhisou on compulsory voting, although I’d rather have Re-Open Nominations as a candidate.

  14. blog@davecole.org August 10, 2009 at 11:02 am #

    Jose – absolutely. Vote or eat a turd sandwich!I agree with Zhisou on compulsory voting, although I’d rather have Re-Open Nominations as a candidate.

  15. 67pepeperez@gmal.com August 11, 2009 at 6:56 am #

    So we may have to acknowledge dictatorships’ position regarding the compulsory voting: “Either you vote or you won’t receive your pay this month, is it?”If you start making things compulsory in a democracy (is this a democracy?) then in less than no time we will be under a tyranny.

  16. 67pepeperez@gmal.com August 11, 2009 at 6:56 am #

    So we may have to acknowledge dictatorships’ position regarding the compulsory voting: “Either you vote or you won’t receive your pay this month, is it?”If you start making things compulsory in a democracy (is this a democracy?) then in less than no time we will be under a tyranny.

  17. blog@davecole.org August 11, 2009 at 12:21 pm #

    Bugger. I just typed out a long response and forgot to put in my email address, so it’s lost the post.In short:Jose – there are plenty of things that are compulsory under a democracy. Not murdering people is compulsory; putting your bins out is compulsory. If you prevent the state from compelling people to take or refrain from taking an action, you very quickly move to a Hobbesian state of nature.The question is whether the compulsion impinges on liberty to an unacceptable degree given the benefits it can brings. I’d say that a duty of participation, on the basis that democracies are not necessarily self-sustaining and that we have a problem of lack of political engagement at the moment, is not unreasonable. It also has the effects of preventing the established parties from simply appealing to their core votes and being able to win elections and makes it easier for new and small parties to do better. This is not, of course, a good thing in all circumstances, but might be appropriate for the UK at the moment.There are plenty of countries where merely making voting obligatory, even without sanction, has improved turnout.xD.

  18. blog@davecole.org August 11, 2009 at 12:21 pm #

    Bugger. I just typed out a long response and forgot to put in my email address, so it’s lost the post.In short:Jose – there are plenty of things that are compulsory under a democracy. Not murdering people is compulsory; putting your bins out is compulsory. If you prevent the state from compelling people to take or refrain from taking an action, you very quickly move to a Hobbesian state of nature.The question is whether the compulsion impinges on liberty to an unacceptable degree given the benefits it can brings. I’d say that a duty of participation, on the basis that democracies are not necessarily self-sustaining and that we have a problem of lack of political engagement at the moment, is not unreasonable. It also has the effects of preventing the established parties from simply appealing to their core votes and being able to win elections and makes it easier for new and small parties to do better. This is not, of course, a good thing in all circumstances, but might be appropriate for the UK at the moment.There are plenty of countries where merely making voting obligatory, even without sanction, has improved turnout.xD.

  19. 67pepeperez@gmal.com August 11, 2009 at 4:11 pm #

    What you say, Dave, smells of Nanny State. I am sorry to say that freedom of choice, among many options, is also the freedom not to vote.Do you think any elected parliamentarian would dare to approve a law compelling people to vote? I don’t think so, one of the first reasons is that abstention sometimes may benefit a party or other.What I’d like it to happen everywhere is that education, the right education, teaches everybody which is right and which is wrong in democracy. Train them to opt for what they believe it is the right thing for them.Sometimes I wonder what our “elected” parliamentarians are doing if not what their party leaders instruct them to do.

  20. 67pepeperez@gmal.com August 11, 2009 at 4:11 pm #

    What you say, Dave, smells of Nanny State. I am sorry to say that freedom of choice, among many options, is also the freedom not to vote.Do you think any elected parliamentarian would dare to approve a law compelling people to vote? I don’t think so, one of the first reasons is that abstention sometimes may benefit a party or other.What I’d like it to happen everywhere is that education, the right education, teaches everybody which is right and which is wrong in democracy. Train them to opt for what they believe it is the right thing for them.Sometimes I wonder what our “elected” parliamentarians are doing if not what their party leaders instruct them to do.

  21. blog@davecole.org August 11, 2009 at 5:35 pm #

    I don’t care if is nanny state. There are some areas where we don’t give people freedom of choice. This could be one of them; people could even cast a blank ballot, so long as they make the effort to do so.As to elected politicians favouring compulsory voting – Australia.

  22. blog@davecole.org August 11, 2009 at 5:35 pm #

    I don’t care if is nanny state. There are some areas where we don’t give people freedom of choice. This could be one of them; people could even cast a blank ballot, so long as they make the effort to do so.As to elected politicians favouring compulsory voting – Australia.

  23. 67pepeperez@gmail.com August 12, 2009 at 10:40 am #

    I understand what you mean, Dave, and things have gone so out of control that I sometimes think like you do.But while people don’t realise what are really their rights, how much they can achieve by using those rights, Democracy won’t be real in our countries.So if there is no Democracy it’s not our leaders’ fault but just ours. It’s we who can fix matters up no doubt.

  24. 67pepeperez@gmail.com August 12, 2009 at 10:40 am #

    I understand what you mean, Dave, and things have gone so out of control that I sometimes think like you do.But while people don’t realise what are really their rights, how much they can achieve by using those rights, Democracy won’t be real in our countries.So if there is no Democracy it’s not our leaders’ fault but just ours. It’s we who can fix matters up no doubt.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s