Yay! The Story of Stuff makes The NYT

11 May

I just received an email alerting me that Annie Leonard’s wonderful 20-minute animation, The Story of Stuff, made The New York Times’ front page. I first mentioned Annie’s work, briefly, in 2007.

It appears that the video has become a hit in America’s classrooms, where teachers are using it to convey the basic law of economics: that finite resources are just that, finite. And that our rabid consumerism is accelerating the use of our planets limited resources.

Watch it here. Really, you should. It’s excellent.

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4 Responses to “Yay! The Story of Stuff makes The NYT”

  1. btrzcins@vt.edu May 12, 2009 at 4:33 am #

    Her section on computers made me skeptical of the entire video. I am studying Computer Engineering right now, and pretty much all of her facts or actions are incorrect. Her claim that only the CPU changes in each architecture change is absurd — and I like the insinuation that a socket change is made just to “change the shape” to induce consumption. Umm, what? How about that a new socket and architecture can be built to use less energy — a LOT less energy? Her old “less fashionable” CRT also uses upwards of 90 W in power — versus only 15 W or so in a new LCD. Care to comment on the energy involved in destroying the old CRT versus continuously using it for another 5 years, Annie? 5x is a pretty big factor…Another of her insinuations fairly early on — that cities are wasteful, dirty, and a conglomeration of all that is wrong with the “system” — is also farcical. While I’m sure Annie may drive “as little as possible” out there in Berkeley, CA, I drive *not at all* thanks to living in the biggest and the dirtiest — New York City. I use the MTA, live in a small apartment, and do my shopping on foot. New Yorkers use a tiny fraction of what nearly everyone else uses energy-wise — especially Californians. But, it never feels good to look at real numbers when you can make slick childrens’ videos that gloss over real analysis to go with “feel good” assertions — if there’s a tree outside your window, you must be doing something better!

  2. btrzcins@vt.edu May 12, 2009 at 4:33 am #

    Her section on computers made me skeptical of the entire video. I am studying Computer Engineering right now, and pretty much all of her facts or actions are incorrect. Her claim that only the CPU changes in each architecture change is absurd — and I like the insinuation that a socket change is made just to “change the shape” to induce consumption. Umm, what? How about that a new socket and architecture can be built to use less energy — a LOT less energy? Her old “less fashionable” CRT also uses upwards of 90 W in power — versus only 15 W or so in a new LCD. Care to comment on the energy involved in destroying the old CRT versus continuously using it for another 5 years, Annie? 5x is a pretty big factor…Another of her insinuations fairly early on — that cities are wasteful, dirty, and a conglomeration of all that is wrong with the “system” — is also farcical. While I’m sure Annie may drive “as little as possible” out there in Berkeley, CA, I drive *not at all* thanks to living in the biggest and the dirtiest — New York City. I use the MTA, live in a small apartment, and do my shopping on foot. New Yorkers use a tiny fraction of what nearly everyone else uses energy-wise — especially Californians. But, it never feels good to look at real numbers when you can make slick childrens’ videos that gloss over real analysis to go with “feel good” assertions — if there’s a tree outside your window, you must be doing something better!

  3. brian0918@gmail.com May 20, 2009 at 8:41 pm #

    The definitive critique to the Story of Stuff:

  4. brian0918@gmail.com May 20, 2009 at 8:41 pm #

    The definitive critique to the Story of Stuff:

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